Paper Borders

​Why have a border?

Some borders are very useful in adding a layer of protection when handling the print, allowing you to maneuver it and also avoid touching the image surface. In addition, the image edges are less likely to get dinged or dented with the extra border space to keep it pristine.

Originals by Neil Zeller

Some Borders

When you request “some borders”, Resolve Photo will leave an unprinted paper margin around the image, this border could be anywhere from ¼ inch – 2 inches or even 3+ inches. 

Wondering why?

The answer comes down to our workflow, efficiency, and the materiality of the paper. Depending on your image size, we will choose a sheet or roll of paper that is bigger than your image. The resulting unprinted area left around your image helps us determine how much border margin can be left. This can vary when printing one image versus multiple images as we may choose to print them closer together to maximize our efficiency or further apart due to the nature of the paper and how we work with it. 

​When requesting “some borders” on multiple prints, your prints may have different borders on the different prints, even when the image size is the same. When you request some borders, we do not guarantee any uniformity of the borders between prints across your current project or from previous projects.

Adding some borders is free. Your print cost will be based on the square footage of the image area.

Originals by Derek Bisbing

Exact Borders

So you want an exact border around your image. The decision is intentional because there is some importance to how that space will be used in the final presentation of your work. 

​One example for exact borders is when you have an existing frame with a different aspect ratio than your image. If you can’t or don’t want to crop your image or custom framing is out of the question, adding a border to fill the space between the image to the frame is a great solution. The border margins on top and bottom versus the left and right may not and don’t have to be uniform. 

Another reason you may want an exact border is if you are signing under the image in the reveal space. You want to leave enough border to accommodate the size of your signature, stamp, or embossment (see our signing post). Measure your signature and make sure to request the exact border  to accommodate matting or the framing overhang. 

You may also want an exact border purely for aesthetic reasons, like to show off the unique texture of your paper, or to keep a consistent look between projects.

Whatever the reason, your exact border request means we trim to those specific dimensions and your borders will be free from any flaws.

The print cost will be determined by the total square footage of your image and border specifications.

Originals by Kirsten Costoulas

No Borders (aka Full Bleed)

This is a classic option with the printed image going right to the edge of the paper. Our printers do not print to the paper edge so this is trimmed by hand. How the image will be presented should be fully considered since you cannot recover the trimmed paper.

A full bleed print will most commonly be mounted or framed at the same size. An 11×14 inch frame will need the image printed 11×14 inches to fit inside the existing frame edge to edge. Full bleed is a popular framing and mounting choice either by convenience or part of your artistic vision.

What about images that have a white background or border built into the file?

We also treat these types of files as full bleed. If you have already taken the time to incorporate white space around your image or collage, it’s probably for good reason, so we will trim to the edge of the image size leaving no additional margin. Adding an additional border would make it difficult to determine where your image ends and the extra margin begins unless you take out your ruler or we leave a stroke around your image. This is not common so you will want to let us know as that is a special request.

Generally, full bleed print prices are determined by the square footage of the paper size. Some exceptions may apply.